PATRIOT LT. COL. HENRY (HAL) DIXON

   

 



A Biographical Sketch of
Patriot Lt. Col. Henry (Hal) Dixon


(Patriot ancestor of Edward Courtland Snyder, Jr.
and Edward Courtland Snyder Ill)


Lt. Col. Henry (Hal) Dixon

 

Colonel Dixon, affectionately known as "Hal" by his soldiers, had a long and distinguished record of military service to the Revolution.


Edward Courtland Snyder, Jr. and Edward Courtland Snyder Ill are descendants of Lt. Col.Henry (Hal) Dixon. He was born in 1740 in Caswell County, NC, the son of Henry Dixon and Elizabeth Abernathy who had migrated earlier from Virginia. He married Martha Wynne, a descendant of Jamestown settlers and they had seven children; Francis, Wynne, Elizabeth, Roger, Robert, Henry lll, and Susannah.

Colonel Dixon, affectionately known as "Hal" by his soldiers, had a long and distinguished record of military service to the Revolution. He participated in numerous battles of the Revolution, was wounded in battle three times and died of battlefield wounds on 17 July 1782 in a camp at Round O, SC. On 27 Feb. 1775, Captain Henry Dixon was among 1000 Patriots that intercepted and destroyed an 800 man Loyalist force, at the Battle of Moore's Creek Bridge (near Wilmington , NC), that was trying to unite with the British. He was appointed Captain, 1st NC Regiment, Continental Line on 1 Sept. 1775, after the Legislature Act in Hillsboro, N.C., the 21st of Aug 1775. He transferred to the 8th NC in Jan. 1777. Hal Dixon fought at Brandywine (9/11/1777). He was appointed Major 3rd NC on 4 Oct 1777 and fought at Germantown on the same day. Dixon suffered with his men at Valley Forge during the winter of 1777-1778. He was appointed LTCol 12 May 1778 and fought at Monmouth (6/20/1778). He was severely wounded in a bayonet charge at Stono Ferry (6/20/1779). He apparently recovered enough to command the North Carolina Militia at the Battle of Camden (8/16/1779). NC Governor Richard Caswell had persuaded Gen. Jethro Sumner, that Col. Dixon be given command of the Militia. He next fought at Guilford Courthouse (3/15/1781). Hal Dixon was transferred to the 2nd NC on 6 Feb. 1782. and died in service 17 July 1782.

Noting Col. Dixon’s brave action at the Battle of Camden, Col. Henry “ Light Horse Harry” Lee wrote:

"None, without violence to the claims of honor and justice, can withhold applause from Colonel Dixon and his North Carolina Regiment...Col. Dixon had seen service, having commanded a Continental regiment under Washington. By his precepts and example he infused his own spirit into the breasts of his troops; who emulating the noble ardor of their leader, demonstrated the wisdom of selecting experienced officers to commend raw soldiers.”

A monument of solid and heavy granite was erected on the Guilford Battle Ground in a conspicuous place near the railroad on July 4, 1896. A bronze tablet affixed thereto recites the names and dates of the battles in which "Hal" Dixon was engaged along with other incidents of his history.

 

 

     

     
     

Go to the Site Map

     
     

     
         
   


Thanks for Viewing the SARSAT.ORG Website.
Please Return Soon.
 

   
         
           
   

Webmaster:

Max Strozier

   
           
   

Web Page Created:

19 August 2009

   
   

Web Page Updated:

11 October 2009