PATRIOT JOSE ANTONIO CURBELO

   





A Biography of Jose Antonio Curbelo

JOSE ANTONIO CURBELO

Born: May 1, 1746, San Fernando de Bexar

Died: September 4, 1789, San Fernando de Bexar

Descendents: Compatriots George E. Perez and Rueben M. Perez

 

Compatriots George E. Perez and Rueben M. Perez are bloodline descendents of Joseph Antonio Curbello who assisted in establishing American Independence while acting in the capacity of a patriot by donating and delivering cattle to Bernando De Galvaz troops in Louisiana.

Jose Antonio Curbelo was born in the Villa of San Fernando de Bexar. His parents were Juan Curbelo, born in Lanzarote, Canary Islands and married to Garcia Pardomo Umpienes, also born in Lanzarote. The family homestead was located adjacent to the Bexar County Courthouse and later referred to as “La Quinta”, during the Texas Revolution. Jose Antonio married Rita Flores and had five children. The Lipan Indians killed Jose Antonio Curbelo along with five other citizens of Bejar in 1789.

Jose Antonio Curbelo is known as a soldier, cattleman, (alcalde) mayor, Lieutenant Governor of the Province of Texas, and patriot of the American Revolution. In January of 1780, Joseph Antonio Curbelo was Lieutenant Governor of the Province of Texas. Upon his return from Spain, after taking buffaloes to the King of Spain, as a token of service to the king, he was appointed to the active rank of active lieutenant in December 1, 1786.

He was listed as a cattleman and rancher in the Petition of Cibolo Ranchers in October 5, 1778 in the Spanish Archives of the General Land Office. While fighting and defending the Gulf Coast against the British, Bernando de Galvez sent an emissary to San Antonio to request the delivery of cattle from Texas to Louisiana to supply his troops. Criox, Commander of New Spain Province granted permission to the Texas Governor Cabello in 1779. Jose Antonio Curbelo, asked and received permission to export two herds of cattle totaling over one thousand heads of cattle. Records showed that in 1781, Joseph Antonio Curbelo trailed and delivered cattle from Bexar to Louisiana to support the efforts of the American Revolution against the British. He is listed as San Antonio Spanish American, Patriotic Service to the cause of the American Revolution.

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Curbello was a descendent of Canary Islanders, born on May 1, 1746, in San Antonio, Texas; his father was Joseph Curbello. He married Rita Flores, had five children and died on September 4, 1789. (Baptismal records, San Fernando records). He was listed as a cattleman and rancher in the Petition of Cibolo Ranchers, October 5, 1778 (Spanish Archives of the General Land Office).


While fighting and defending the Gulf Coast against the British, Bernando De Galvaz sent his emissary, Francisco Garcia, to San Antonio to request the delivery of cattle from Texas to Louisiana to supply his troops. Criox, Commander of the New Spain Province granted permission to the Texas Governor Cabello in 1779.


In 1779, while absent from the Presidio de Bexar, Cabello named Antonio Curbello as interim lieutenant governor. Antonio Curbello, lieutenant governor of the Province of Texas, asked and received permission to export two herds of cattle totaling over one thousand. Records indicate that in 1781, Joseph Antonio Curbello donated and delivered cattle to supply Bernando Galvaz troops in Louisiana and support the efforts of the American Revolution against the British.


(The Texas Connection, Robert Thonhoff, page 72, footnotes #53. Joseph Antonio Curbello to Cabel1o, September 17, 1781, Bexar Archives (BAT, 2C45, vo1. 108, 137 -138, page 17, footnote # 28.

 

 

     

     
     

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